Malaysia develops content industry to maintain ASEAN’s culture

Vietnam’s first ultra-clear float glass production facility, mainly used in solar panels, started construction in the southern province of Ba Ria-Vung Tau yesterday, to meet the booming demand of the solar industry. Vietnam's first ultra-clear float glass production facility will primarily produce for export The project is developed by Phu My Ultra Clear Float Glass Co., Ltd, a consortium of leading domestic building materials firm Viglacera, Vietnam Urban and Industrial Zone Development Investment Corporation, and China’s Kaisheng Group. It is estimated that the $110-million phase I will be carried out by 2018. It is expected to churn out 6,000 tonnes of products per day and rising to 9,000 tonnes of products after phase II is finished. According to Viglacera, which owns 35 per cent of the consortium, 90 per cent of the facility’s ultra-white output will be exported to overseas, and 10 per cent will be sold to a glass processor in the northern province of Bac Giang, the home of the largest solar energy assembly project in Vietnam. The factory in Ba Ria-Vung Tau is one of the two ultra-clear float glass plants scheduled for construction in Vietnam. The other plant will be in northern province of Bac Ninh. The prime minister  gave in-principle approval to the construction of these plants in late-2016. Viglacera general director Nguyen Anh Tuan said at the company’s annual shareholders’ meeting that ultra-clear float glass, produced to be used in solar panels, is a new field that requires high-technology, prompting Viglacera…... [read more]

Hanoi, July 24 (VNA) - Supercomputers will be deployed to unify databases of different agencies managing information about war invalids and martyrs, significantly reducing time taken to locate documents or determine the identity of remains.  The unification is a joint attempt by the Ministry of Information and Communications (MoIC), Ministry of Defence (MoD), and Ministry of Labour, Invalids, and Social Affairs (MoLISA) to mark the 70th anniversary of the National War Invalids and Martyrs Day (27/7/1947 – 27/7/2017).  The Policy Department under the MoD currently manages three databases, two on pre-2015 and post-2015 war invalids and martyrs, and one decryption database.  Meanwhile, the National Devotees Bureau under the MoLISA, which manages data on citizens who’ve contributed to the revolutionary cause, has two databases, on pre-2015 war invalids and martyrs, and another on war martyrs, their relatives and war martyrs’ cemeteries (pre-2015).  However, each of these databases has been independently established with its own security measures, and the resultant overlap makes it difficult to cross-check and update information.  The National Institute of Software and Digital Content Industry (NISCI) under MoIC has now been tasked with using supercomputers to standardise and consolidate the existing databases on war invalids and martyrs.  The institute said the trillion calculations and intensive collation involved form an enormous workload that only supercomputers and machine learning technology can tackle.  The information will also be uploaded onto a website that the public can access. The website will not only serve as…... [read more]

The unification is a joint attempt by the Ministry of Information and Communications (MoIC), Ministry of Defence (MoD), and Ministry of Labour, Invalids, and Social Affairs (MoLISA) to mark the 70th anniversary of the National War Invalids and Martyrs Day (27/7/1947 – 27/7/2017). The Policy Department under the MoD currently manages three databases, two on pre-2015 and post-2015 war invalids and martyrs, and one decryption database. Meanwhile, the National Devotees Bureau under the MoLISA, which manages data on citizens who’ve contributed to the revolutionary cause, has two databases, on pre-2015 war invalids and martyrs, and another on war martyrs, their relatives and war martyrs’ cemeteries (pre-2015). However, each of these databases has been independently established with its own security measures, and the resultant overlap makes it difficult to cross-check and update information. The National Institute of Software and Digital Content Industry (NISCI) under MoIC has now been tasked with using supercomputers to standardise and consolidate the existing databases on war invalids and martyrs. The institute said the trillion calculations and intensive collation involved form an enormous workload that only supercomputers and machine learning technology can tackle. The information will also be uploaded onto a website that the public can access. The website will not only serve as a unified portal to search for information on war invalids and martyrs but also as a place where people can post information on what they know about war heroes who remain unaccounted for. …... [read more]

Supercomputers will be deployed to unify databases of different agencies managing information on war invalids and martyrs, significantly reducing time taken to locate documents or determine the identity of remains. About 200,000 sets of remains lying scattered across southern provinces, Laos and Cambodia haven’t been collected, while another 300,000 sets of remains that have been reburied in martyrs’ cemeteries lack information to make an accurate identification.  The unification is a joint attempt by the Ministry of Information and Communications (MoIC), Ministry of Defence (MoD), and Ministry of Labour, Invalids, and Social Affairs (MoLISA) to mark the 70th anniversary of the National War Invalids and Martyrs Day (27/7/1947 – 27/7/2017). The Policy Department under the MoD currently manages three databases, two on pre-2015 and post-2015 war invalids and martyrs, and one decryption database. Meanwhile, the National Devotees Bureau under the MoLISA, which manages data on citizens who’ve contributed to the revolutionary cause, has two databases, on pre-2015 war invalids and martyrs, and another on war martyrs, their relatives and war martyrs’ cemeteries (pre-2015). However, each of these databases has been independently established with its own security measures, and the resultant overlap makes it difficult to cross-check and update information. The National Institute of Software and Digital Content Industry (NISCI) under MoIC has now been tasked with using supercomputers to standardise and consolidate the existing databases on war invalids and martyrs. The institute said the trillion calculations and intensive collation involved form an enormous workload that only supercomputers and machine learning technology…... [read more]

Google and Apple have imposed payment policies for digital content services, resulting in a significant drop in the revenue of their Vietnamese digital content businesses. Google and Apple now require payments to go through their exclusive gateways Technology giants Google and Apple, which have strict terms around the globe, have recently launched tighter regulations on payment, forcing users to pay through their payment gateways. The new regulation from the two tech giants has become a big hitch for Vietnamese businesses when putting payment policies in two digital content platforms, while Vietnamese people still have a habit of paying mainly through scratch cards. The costs of digital content businesses have increased by 30 per cent for Google and Apple, higher than the payment channel of scratch cards that digital content providers pay for telecommunication in Vietnam due to the newly exclusive payment of Google and Apple, according to Luu Vu Hai, chairman of Vietnam Multimedia Corporation (VTC). Hai added that the imposition of Google and Apple’s exclusive payment policies is a common difficulty and affects not only for VTC, but the digital content industry at large. Nguyen Thanh Hung, director of VTC Intecom, said that almost all Vietnamese digital content businesses has released services and do business on the two major mobile platforms, Apple’s iOS and Google’s Android. Therefore, Vietnamese mobile service businesses greatly depend on Apple and Google. The digital content service…... [read more]

Deputy Minister of Information and Communications Nguyen Minh Hong delivered the statement at a conference themed “Public – private partnership in IT development” in Hanoi on June 18. The conference was jointly held by the Vietnam Software Association (VINASA) and the Asian-Oceania Computing Industry Organisation (ASOCIO) as part of the latter’s plenary session this year in Vietnam from June 17-20. Deputy Minister Hong said Vietnam wishes to learn IT development experiences from ASOCIO member economies. Over the recent years, Vietnam’s IT industry grew by leaps and bounds at more than 20 percent in 2009 gaining over US$6.26 billion or 7 percent of the GDP. Last year, the domestic software industry grew by 35-40 percent to earn US$880 million while the digital content industry increased by 50 percent to hit nearly US$700 million. According to the latest study of A.T.Kearney, a leading consultant company from the US, Vietnam is one of the top ten countries in terms of software outsourcing.... [read more]

This is the main target of a project to make the country soon become stronger in information technology and communication, which was approved by the Prime Minister on September 22, 2010. Digital content corners the market Digital content is no longer a novelty to Vietnamese people, especially the young ones, as they daily use computers and mobile phones with different kinds of services such as email, chat, blog, game online and e-business. Vietnam is a promising market with 30 million internet users and nearly 50 million mobile phones owners. Some years ago, digital content products were provided by a limited number of businesses in Vietnam including the VinaGame Group (VNG), the Vietnam Multimedia Corporation (VTC), the FPT Group and the Vietnam Data Communication Company (VDC). In fact, two Vietnamese social networks (go.vn and Zingme), VTC and the online newspaper VnExpress are still lagging far behind the giant trademarks of Google, Yahoo, Facebook and Twitter. Global digital content services are expected to reach an impressive figure of US$1.3-1.7 trillion in 2014 with the Asia-Pacific region holding the lion’s share and Vietnam alone earning US$1 billion last year thanks to its annual growth rate of 50 percent in five successive years. Many universities and businesses are focused on training human resources for this industry. FPT has recently opened its own university while Bac Ha International University has sought investment from the CMC Corporation and Viettel Group. “As there are no special courses for students, VTC is now in charge of training them…... [read more]

MIC Deputy Minister Nguyen Minh Hong said the event provides assistance to businesses and scientists involved in the information technology (IT) industry to seek cross-border partnership opportunities. Digital content is a new but very promising sector that has already contributed to Vietnam’s economic growth. Although estimated to account for just 10 percent of earnings from IT industries, revenue from digital content has grown 20-40 percent over the past ten years. In 2011, Vietnam’s IT sector consisted of 500-600 enterprises generating over 60,000 jobs and earning over US$1 billion. Choi Youn Chel, a representative from the Korean Creative Content Agency (KOCCA), said the RoK has the leading digital content industry in the world, with the market valued at nearly US$3 billion in 2012. The country is now focusing on new technologies for personalisation, 3D and virtual reality.... [read more]

The report says that in the past decade Vietnam has had one of the world’s highest rates of growth, second only to China, and this trend is likely to continue in the future. The country has been successful in creating dynamic export markets, the report adds. The report provides specific examples of the dynamic development of Vietnam’s information technology (IT) industry, which was one of its highest growth industries from 1995 to 2008, attracting almost US$2 billion in investment from 332 foreign IT companies. The survey underlines the role of the Vietnamese Government in promoting privatization, investing in the software and digital content industry, protecting copyrights, improving infrastructure and developing human resources. It attributes Vietnam’s attractiveness to the country’s moderate to low risk level and its political stability.... [read more]

(CPV) - The Vietnam Internet Association on December 21st, 2016, organised the 5th Internet Day titled “How digital content contributes to Internet economy”, drawing the participation of over 500 local and foreign representatives. Under the sponsorship of the Ministry of Information and Communications (MoIC), and main sponsor VNG Company, the event emphasized that a digital economy is an inevitable step for development as the traditional economy is being saturated. According to Mr Nguyen Thanh Hung, MoIC Deputy Minister, the wide application of information technology (IT) in all activities of a digital economy would bring high profits; some countries have defined the digital economy as a new developmental driving force for their socio-economic growth and development, as well as enhancing the national competitive capacity on a global scale. In recent years, the digital content industry in Vietnam has seen remarkable development, playing a more important role in the country’s IT sector. The revenue of the digital content industry increased from USD480 million to USD1.4 billion in the 2008-2014 period with a yearly growth rate of about 20%. The country’s digital content industry attracted more than 4,500 enterprises, creating 70,000 jobs. Until now, Vietnam has built a diverse digital content industry, including online products for education, entertainment and content for mobile devices, Hung said. Besides current search engines Google, Zalo, fb, zing.vn, some “marketable products” such as Lazada, tiki.vn, uber and grab taxi will continue become major trends of development. During his speech, CEO VNG Le Hong Minh said that since 2010,…... [read more]




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