Can Tho, Japan seek cooperation opportunities in agriculture

At the working session (Source: VNA)   Can Tho (VNA) – Chairman of the People’s Committee of the Mekong Delta city of Can Tho Vo Thanh Thong on August 13 had a working session with a Japanese delegation to discuss cooperation opportunities in agriculture and personnel training in this sector. The Japanese delegation includes Hitoshi Kinouchi, a professor of Tokai University; Susumu Ishihara, an advisor of Japanese language training; and Masayuki Abe, Director of the Human Resource Research Institute and Director of the Vietnam Agricultural Information Centre (VAIO). According to Hitoshi, the Mekong Delta is like Japan in the past as it has small-scale agriculture with production mainly conducted by households, thus hindering product processing and distribution to companies. Japanese farming households have grouped into cooperatives to tackle the problem and also sell agricultural products with high prices, he said. Hitoshi suggested Japan and Can Tho partner with each other in the farming sector, saying the most important issue is how to improve agricultural quality and technology. For his part, Thong said Can Tho is interested in partners and investors from Japan and wishes to cooperate with the Japanese side in personnel training, especially the farming sector. He called on Japan to provide technical support for Can Tho and consider dispatching volunteers to Can Tho to take part in high-tech agriculture research programmes, while helping local farmers access the market and apply high and bio-technologies in the…... [read more]

Chairman of the People’s Committee of the Mekong Delta city of Can Tho Vo Thanh Thong on Sunday had a working session with a Japanese delegation to discuss co-operation opportunities in agriculture and personnel training in this sector. Representatives of Can Tho People’s Committee and Japanese delegation at the meeting.-VNA/VNS Photo Thanh Liem The Japanese delegation includes Hitoshi Kinouchi, a professor of Tokai University; Susumu Ishihara, an advisor of Japanese language training; and Masayuki Abe, director of the Human Resource Research Institute and director of the Vietnam Agricultural Information Centre (VAIC). According to Hitoshi, the Mekong Delta is like Japan in the past as it has small-scale agriculture with production mainly conducted by households, thus hindering product processing and distribution to companies. Japanese farming households have grouped into co-operatives to tackle the problem and also sell agricultural products with high prices, he said. Hitoshi suggested Japan and Can Tho partner with each other in the farming sector, saying the most important issue is how to improve agricultural quality and technology. For his part, Thong said Can Tho is interested in partners and investors from Japan and wishes to co-operate with the Japanese side in personnel training, especially the farming sector. He called on Japan to provide technical support for Can Tho and consider dispatching volunteers to Can Tho to take part in high-tech agriculture research programmes, while helping local farmers access the…... [read more]

In his opening speech, VUFO Chairman Vu Xuan Hong said that the event represents an important landmark in the relationship between the VUFO and ACT based on the 2011 cooperation agreement to help promote international cooperation in the Asia Pacific region. Japanese ambassador to Vietnam Tanizaki Yasuaki said he is happy to see positive developments in cooperative relations between the two countries, adding that both sides need to implement specific activities to effectively realize the signed agreements. The seminar focused on major issues including nuclear energy and nuclear power safety policies in Japan, sharing experiences in nuclear power, and establishing policies for areas adjacent to nuclear power plants. Delegates also discussed issues related to Japan-Vietnam cooperation in information and communication technology and transport infrastructure. Over the past few years, Japan has assisted Vietnam in developing human resources for studying nuclear power technology and building and operating nuclear power plants. Professor Hirose Kenkichi of Japan’s International Training Centre at Tokai University said while it is developing nuclear power technology, Vietnam needs to clarify the authority of nuclear safety agencies, and relevant agencies should provide technical specifications and assistance for safety control, research and troubleshooting.... [read more]

This course was jointly offered by Electricity of Vietnam (EVN) and the International Nuclear Energy Development of Japan Co (JINED) aimed at providing trainees practical hands-on experience in the operation and maintenance of nuclear power plants. At the graduation ceremony on September 19, EVN Director General Le Thanh stated training key employees who are capable of carrying out the project plays a decisive role for the success of the first nuclear power project in Vietnam. After the graduation ceremony, Tokai officially opened a second training course for 9 students scheduled to last from September 2014 to September 2015.... [read more]

The photo collection will include images of the Shirakami-Sanchi Mountain Range, Yakushima Island, Himeji Castle, Buddhist monuments of the Horyu-ji Temple Area, Genbaku Dome, Historic Monuments of Ancient Nara, Historic Monuments of Ancient Kyoto, and Old Villages of Shirakawa and Gokayama. Kazuyoshi Miyoshi, born in 1958, is a native of Tokushima Prefecture. He graduated from Tokai University in 1981. At age 27 he won the 11th Kimura Ihei Photography Award for a photo collection, “Rakuen” (“Paradise”), a series of images taken on tropical islands such as the Seychelles and Maldives. His photographs are showcased in esteemed collections the world over, including the permanent collection of the George Eastman House International Museum of Photography and Film in the USA. The exhibition is being sponsored by the Japan Foundation Centre for Cultural Exchange in Vietnam.... [read more]

Rescue workers conduct a search and rescue operation to a collapsed house at a landslide site caused by earthquakes in Minamiaso town, Kumamoto prefecture, southern Japan, in this photo taken by Kyodo April 16, 2016. Photo credit: Reuters/Kyodo The desperate search for survivors intensified on Sunday in the splintered remains of buildings destroyed by Japan's deadly earthquake and authorities ordered nearly a quarter of a million people from their homes amid fears of further quakes. A 7.3 magnitude tremor struck early on Saturday morning, killing at least 32 people, injuring about a thousand more and causing widespread damage to houses, roads and bridges. It was the second major quake to hit Kumamoto province on the island of Kyushu in just over 24 hours. The first, late on Thursday, killed nine people. Rescuers on Sunday searched for dozens of people feared trapped or buried alive, while survivors queued for scarce supplies of food and water. Factories for companies including Sony, Honda and Toyota halted production as they assessed damage in the region, an important manufacturing hub in Japan's south. In the village of Minamiaso, eight people remain "out of contact", said public broadcaster NHK. Rescuers pulled 10 students out of a collapsed university apartment in the town of Minamiaso on Saturday. Overnight, rescuers digging with their bare hands dragged some elderly survivors, still in their pyjamas, out of the rubble and onto makeshift stretchers made of tatami mats. "The Self Defense Force, police and fire-fighters have been working to rescue people…... [read more]

Rescue workers conduct a search and rescue operation to a collapsed house at a landslide site caused by earthquakes in Minamiaso town, Kumamoto prefecture, southern Japan, in this photo taken by Kyodo April 16, 2016. Photo: Reuters/Kyodo Japanese rescuers dug through the rubble of collapsed buildings and mud on Saturday to reach dozens believed trapped after a powerful 7.3 magnitude earthquake struck a southern island, killing at least 26 people and injuring about a thousand. The shallow earthquake hit in the early hours, sending people fleeing from their beds and on to dark streets, and follows a 6.4 magnitude quake on Thursday which killed nine people in the area. Television footage showed fires, power outages, collapsed bridges and gaping holes in the earth. Residents near a dam were told to leave because of fears it might crumble, broadcaster NHK said "I felt strong shaking at first, then I was thrown about like I was in a washing machine," said a Tokai University student who remains isolated in the village of Minamiaso in Kumamoto province on the island of Kyushu. "All the lights went out and I heard a loud noise. A lot of gas is leaking and while there hasn't been a fire, that remains a concern," the student, who is sheltering in a university gym with 1,000 other students and residents, told Japanese media. There were also concerns for those trapped under rubble overnight with heavy rain forecast and the temperature expected to drop to 13 degrees Celsius (55…... [read more]

The complacency and cosy relationships blamed for the Fukushima nuclear accident are still a problem in Japan, experts warn, even as the country faces the probability of another earthquake and tsunami that could dwarf the 2011 catastrophe. Friday marks the fifth anniversary of the natural disaster that claimed about 18,500 lives, flattened coastal communities, and set off the worst atomic crisis in a generation. But, as officials vow to prevent a repeat, some critics say Tokyo's push to restart switched-off nuclear reactors is proof that the lessons of the tragedy have not been learned. And many question whether Japan has done enough to tackle some of the key causes of the accident that unfolded on March 11, 2011 -- an ill-fated belief in the nation's disaster management and clubby ties between politicians, bureaucrats and the nuclear industry. "These kind of relationships can be seen in other countries but Japan is a standout," said Muneyuki Shindo, an honorary politics professor at Chiba University. "Ties between the bureaucracy and industry are still very strong -- it's a legacy of government-led development when the country was underdeveloped" after World War II. Prime Minister Shinzo Abe has made bringing nuclear power back online a priority for the resource-poor country -- a move backed by the business community but strongly opposed by a wary public. Japan's entire stable of reactors was shuttered in the aftermath of the disaster, when a huge undersea quake sent a tsunami smashing into the coast, swamping the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear…... [read more]

On the left a photograph of Hisashi Tezuka, a former kamikaze pilot, taken in March 1945 and on the right an undated photograph of Tadamasa Iwai, a former underwater human torpedo and suicide diver. Both had late reprieves, both saw the futility of that war, and both became passionate pacifists. Source: Hisashi Tezuka and Tadamasa Iwai via Bloomberg Hisashi Tezuka knew his life had been spared when he heard the Emperor’s voice crackling through the wireless. As Hirohito announced Japan’s wartime surrender on Aug. 15, 1945, the young kamikaze pilot was on a train to the island of Shikoku to carry out his sacrificial mission. He received his orders just two days earlier at a base about 1,150 kilometers (715 miles) to the north. The crawling speed of the locomotive kept him alive. "If we’d been taken by plane, we’d have arrived before the war ended," Tezuka, now 93 and one of the few surviving kamikaze, said in an interview at his home in Yokohama. "It was like fate intervened." Tezuka was one of a few thousand men, some as young as 17, in Japan’s so-called special attack unit, or tokkotai. Another was Tadamasa Iwai, a 94-year-old who trained to be a human torpedo and suicide diver. Both had late reprieves, both saw the futility of the war, and both became passionate pacifists. This is a year of painful remembrance for Japan as the country marks the 70th anniversary of its surrender in World War II, a conflict that killed…... [read more]

Vietnam has focussed on training and developing human resources for nuclear power projects in the coming time, the Vietnam Economic News reported. Director General of the Vietnam Agency for Radiation and Nuclear Safety Vuong Huu Tan said the country would need about 6,000-10,000 workers to construct, operate and maintain its nuclear power plants. Training human resources in operation and maintenance fields plays a key role, added Tan. Director General of Electricity of Vietnam (EVN) Pham Le Thanh said there would be large demand for human resources for nuclear power plants. On average, a nuclear power plant with a capacity of about 2,000 MW needs 1,100 people directly involved in operation and maintenance works. To date, core members participating in the construction and operations of the Ninh Thuan 1 and Ninh Thuan 2 nuclear power plants have been trained in Russia and Japan , respectively. The International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) introduced seven key issues in infrastructure development of nuclear power and one of them is human resource training. To date, with the IAEA's support, the Ministry of Science and Technology has built training programmes on nuclear power based on development phases. Vietnam has sent 300 students to Russia to study subjects related to nuclear power and many officers have taken part in study tours abroad. For example, EVN collaborated with the International Nuclear Energy Development of Japan Co., Ltd (JINED) and the Tokai University to train 15 core members for the Ninh Thuan 2 Nuclear Power Plant project. In particular,…... [read more]




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