Endangered primate rescued after straying into town in central Vietnam

A gray-shanked douc langur (pygathrix cinerea) in central Vi​etnam. Qu​ang Nam Province plans to restore a 80ha forest to protect a herd of 50 gray-shanked douc langurs in N​ui Th​anh District. (Photo: GreenViet) Quang Nam (VNA) - The central province of Quang Nam plans to restore a 80ha forest as habitat for a herd of gray-shanked douc langurs living in Dong Co village, Tam My Tay commune.   Huynh Tan Duc, director of the provincial Agriculture and Rural Development, said the forest area in question had been allocated for acacia – one of the most profitable woods in the central region, but this stole the endangered langurs’ natural habitat. He said the langurs now live in a 5ha primary forest, and face being hunted by locals as well as poachers. “We will replant some indigenous species to provide food for the primates. A large area of forest will be restored from the commune to the riverhead of Phu Ninh, Bac Tra My and Tien Phuoc districts in the province,” Duc said, adding that the forest area will help connect with primary forests in neighbouring Quang Ngai province.   “The department will collaborate with local administrations and rangers to hold more patrol and protection of the langurs, and communications for local residents on the importance of the langurs,” he said. The department will survey the langurs and their habitat in order to create a safe shelter for them in a 4,000ha forest in Tam…... [read more]

The central province of Quang Nam plans to restore a 80ha forest as habitat for a herd of gray-shanked douc langurs living in Dong Co Village, Tam My Tay Commune. A gray-shanked douc langur (pygathrix cinerea) in central Viet Nam. Quang Nam Province plans to restore a 80ha forest to protect a herd of 50 gray-shanked douc langurs in Nui Thanh District.  Huynh Tan Duc, director of the provincial Agriculture and Rural Development, said the forest area in question had been allocated for acacia – one of the most profitable woods in the central region, but this stole the endangered langurs’ natural habitat. He said the langurs now live in a 5ha primary forest, and face being hunted by locals as well as poachers. “We will replant some indigenous species to provide food for the primates. A large area of forest will be restored from the commune to the riverhead of Phú Ninh, Bắc Trà My and Tiên Phước districts in the province,” Đức said, adding that the forest area will help connect with primary forests in neighbouring Quảng Ngãi Province. “The department will collaborate with local administrations and rangers to hold more patrol and protection of the langurs, and communications for local residents on the importance of the langurs,” he said. The department will survey the langurs and their habitat in order to create a safe shelter for them in a 4,000ha forest in Tam Trà Commune, Núi Thành District, he added. Trần Hữu Vỹ, director of the Centre…... [read more]

Huynh Tan Duc, director of the provincial Agriculture and Rural Development, said the forest area in question had been allocated for acacia – one of the most profitable woods in the central region, but this stole the endangered langurs’ natural habitat. A gray-shanked douc langur (pygathrix cinerea) in central Viet Nam. Quang Nam Province plans to restore a 80ha forest to protect a herd of 50 gray-shanked douc langurs in Nui Thanh District.   He said the langurs now live in a 5ha primary forest, and face being hunted by locals as well as poachers. “We will replant some indigenous species to provide food for the primates. A large area of forest will be restored from the commune to the riverhead of Phu Ninh, Bac Tra My and Tien Phuoc districts in the province,” Duc said, adding that the forest area will help connect with primary forests in neighbouring Quang Ngai province. “The department will collaborate with local administrations and rangers to hold more patrol and protection of the langurs, and communications for local residents on the importance of the langurs,” he said. The department will survey the langurs and their habitat in order to create a safe shelter for them in a 4,000ha forest in Tam Tra commune, Nui Thanh district, he added. Tran Huu Vy, director of the Centre of Biodiversity Conservation, GreenViet, said that the centre will help the province track the langurs and offer more measures to…... [read more]

The central province of Quang Nam has initiated a plan to replant 80 hectares (nearly 200 acres) of forest to expand the habitat of a group of rare primates which locals say have been disappearing. Agriculture officials said they will replace local timber plantations with natural forests to give the grey-shanked douc langurs somewhere to live and a fresh food source. They have also asked foreign management officials to maintain round-the-clock patrols of the area to prevent poaching. The promise comes more than a month after the media reported concerns from local people that langurs in the province are slowly being wiped out due to a lack of conservation efforts. Locals said there used to be roughly 100 members of the species in the province, but now only around 20 can be spotted. The population started shrinking around 10 years ago when the forest was cleared to make way for acacia trees that are used for timber, they said. Grey-shanked doucs have been listed as critically endangered by the International Union for Conservation of Nature and are among the 25 most threatened groups of primates in the world.  The animal is native to Quang Nam and several other central provinces. Last year, the Fauna and Flora International announced a discovery of more than 500 individuals in the region, bringing the group’s global population to around 1,000.... [read more]

The central province of Quang Nam has initiated a plan to replant 80 hectares (nearly 200 acres) of forest to expand the habitat of a group of rare primates which locals say have been disappearing. Agriculture officials said they will replace local timber plantations with natural forests to give the grey-shanked douc langurs somewhere to live and a fresh food source. Grey-shanked doucs in Quang Nam Province. Photo by VnExpress/Dac Thanh They have also asked foreign management officials to maintain round-the-clock patrols of the area to prevent poaching. The promise comes more than a month after the media reported concerns from local people that langurs in the province are slowly being wiped out due to a lack of conservation efforts. Locals said there used to be roughly 100 members of the species in the province, but now only around 20 can be spotted. The population started shrinking around 10 years ago when the forest was cleared to make way for acacia trees that are used for timber, they said. Grey-shanked doucs have been listed as critically endangered by the International Union for Conservation of Nature and are among the 25 most threatened groups of primates in the world. The animal is native to Quang Nam and several other central provinces. Last year, the Fauna and Flora International announced a discovery of more than 500 individuals in the region, bringing the group’s global population to around 1,000.... [read more]

The Forest Ranger Sub-department of southern Dong Nai province has completed a project to protect the black-shanked douc langurs found recently on Chua Chan mountain, in Xuan Loc district. A family of black shanked douc langurs lives in Nui Chua National Park The project, which will be submitted to the People’s Committee for approval, aims to create a favourable habitat and feeding area for the langurs, scientifically known as Pygathrix nigripes, an endangered species to help them grow in number. Functional agencies will minimize human presence in the langur-inhabited area of around 24 hectares and take measures to prevent illegal hunting as well as communicate to help the community understanding the mission of protecting wild animals. In June, tens of black-shanked douc langurs have been spotted in Chua Chan mountain in Suoi Cat commune of Xuan Loc district, by the forest protection division of Xuan Loc district and Long Khanh township. Ton Ha Quoc Dung, deputy head of the division, said there are two herds with nearly 20 langurs living at about 300 metres up Chua Chan mountain. Another herd of langurs was spotted at about 600 metres up the mountain. Notably, there are pregnant and baby langurs in all the three herds, he said, adding that this is the first time his forest protection division has discovered such a large number of langurs in Chua Chan mountain. Black-shanked douc langurs are listed as endangered by the International Union for Conservation of Nature and Natural Resources (IUCN). They are found…... [read more]

A family of black shanked douc langurs lives in Nui Chua National Park (Photo infornet.vn)     Dong Nai (VNA) – The Forest Ranger Sub-department of southern Dong Nai province has completed a project to protect the black-shanked douc langurs found recently on Chua Chan mountain, in Xuan Loc district. The project, which will be submitted to the People’s Committee for approval, aims to create a favourable habitat and feeding area for the langurs, scientifically known as Pygathrix nigripes, an endangered species to help them grow in number. Functional agencies will minimize human presence in the langur-inhabited area of around 24 hectares and take measures to prevent illegal hunting as well as communicate to help the community understanding the mission of protecting wild animals. In June, tens of black-shanked douc langurs have been spotted in Chua Chan mountain in Suoi Cat commune of Xuan Loc district, by the forest protection division of Xuan Loc district and Long Khanh township. Ton Ha Quoc Dung, deputy head of the division, said there are two herds with nearly 20 langurs living at about 300 metres up Chua Chan mountain. Another herd of langurs was spotted at about 600 metres up the mountain. Notably, there are pregnant and baby langurs in all the three herds, he said, adding that this is the first time his forest protection division has discovered such a large number of langurs in Chua Chan mountain. Black-shanked douc langurs are listed as endangered…... [read more]

Da Nang authorities plan to install security cameras in the Son Tra Nature Reserve as a part of security camera project launched in the city in 2015. A monkey is killed by a motorbike rider when it tried to cross the road in Son Tra Mountain.  Camera systems will be set up in different sites in the Son Tra Mountains to help security forces respond quickly to traffic accidents or public disorder in the reserve. The city hopes the camera system will curb illegal actions and littering at the reserve. The 4,400ha reserve hosts about 10,000 visitors each month, but there are no check-points in the area to supervise local residents and tourists entering the reserve, allowing for easy access. In 2015, three red-shanked douc langurs, an endangered primate species, were killed by illegal hunters. At least 10ha of forest was illegally logged in the reserve in 2016, and more than 2,000 traps were dismantled by rangers and volunteers.  According to latest reports from the city, more than 16,000 cameras have been installed on streets and outside of living quarters, trading centres, industrial parks, markets, restaurants, hotels, bars and offices in the city since 2015. All camera systems were operational in 2016 in preparation for hosting the 2017 Asia-Pacific Economic Co-operation (APEC) Summit in the city on November 5-11.  VNS... [read more]

The Management Board of the Son Tra Peninsula and Tourism Beaches has planned to arrange this kind of tour for visitors to find out about the brown-shanked douc langur twice a day on a trial basis. Accordingly, the plan was drawn up after the agency studied the living habits of the species, dubbed "the queen of primates." The tour will start at 4:00 am and 4:00 pm every day, the periods of time when the langurs, listed in the Red Book of Vietnam, regularly appear and forage around the Tien Sa route in Son Tra Peninsula. Nguyen Duc Vu, deputy director of the management board, told Tuoi Tre (Youth) newspaper the tour will last for 2-3 hours. Tour guides will show visitors around the forests there, where many families of langurs live, to keep track of their activities. However, the visitors joining the tour must comply with a certain number of principles, including wearing dark clothes or camouflaging themselves with leaves, making no noise, using cameras with telephoto lens to keep a certain distance from the langurs, and not infiltrating the living space of the animals. The tour will help visitors have a better understanding of the rare animals and the primeval forests in the peninsula, and encourage them to join efforts by the city to protect its ‘green lungs,’ according to the Danang City portal.... [read more]

“Vietnam is facing numerous challenges in primate protection,” Deputy Minister of Agriculture and Rural Development Ha Cong Tuan said in his opening speech of the five-day symposium that has attracted 900 delegates from 56 countries and territories. He pointed out difficulties in primate protection in Vietnam, including no buffer zones in shrinking natural reserves, lack of investment and close cooperation between forest rangers and local people, poor managerial capacity, and ineffective law enforcement. “Over the past several decades, forest coverage in the country has declined to about 41% of what it was, seriously impinging on animals’ natural habitat and reducing many animal populations to dangerously low levels,” Tuan said. However, the Deputy Minister also acknowledged Vietnam’s constant effort in conserving the species in the country. Over the past five decades, he said Vietnam has developed a legal framework for natural conservation, and constructed a special-purpose forest system covering more than 2.2 million ha with 30 national parks and 114 natural reserves. The Government of Vietnam has paid due attention to and increased investment in order to ensure biodiversity of wild species, including primates, he added. The Endangered Primate Rescue Centre in the Cuc Phuong National Park is a case in point. Established in 1993, the centre has rescued more than 260 primate individuals, bred 240 individuals of 12 species, and released 50 individuals into the nature. Currently it is taking care of more than 150 individuals. At the event, the International Primatological Society (IPS) President Dr. Tetsuro Matsuzawa stressed the…... [read more]




Links Topics : http://news.c10mt.com/2017/08/endangered-primate-rescued-after.html