Ministry backtracks on dumping into sea

VietNamNet Bridge – The environment ministry has agreed not to dump nearly one million cubic metre of waste mud discarded by a power plant into Binh Thuan Province’s sea following public outcry against the plan. Hon Cau marine protected area in Tuy Phong District, central province of Binh Thuan. The environment ministry has agreed not to dump nearly one million cubic metre of waste mud discarded by Vinh Tan 4 thermal power plant into the sea area.  The Ministry of Natural Resources and Environment Ministry reported on Wednesday that it approved a proposal by Binh Thuan authorities in which the mud and waste sand of Vinh Tan 1 thermal power plant would be dumped at Vinh Tan Port instead of the sea. Vinh Tan Port was previously picked as a landfill for the waste mud dredged by the Vinh Tan 4 thermal power plant. The ministry’s original decision still had to await final approval of the Government. The environment ministry’s u-turn came following pressure from the public and the scientific community as the news broke in June.  The Natural Resources and Environment Deputy Minister Nguyen Linh Ngoc on June 23 agreed to allow Vinh Tan 1 Electricity Company, which is in charge of the power plant of the same name, to dump 918,533 cubic metres of dredged mud and sand into the sea in Tuy Phong District. The sea area in question, however, was located adjacent to Hon Cau marine protected area in Tuy Phong. It is one of 16…... [read more]

Hon Cau marine protected area in Tuy Phong district, central province of Binh Thuan (Photo: VNA) Hanoi (VNA) - The Ministry of Natural Resources and Environment (MoNRE) has agreed not to dump nearly one million cubic metre of waste mud discarded by a power plant into Binh Thuan province’s sea following public outcry against the plan. The MoNRE reported on August 9 that it approved a proposal by Binh Thuan authorities in which the mud and waste sand of Vinh Tan 1 thermal power plant would be dumped at Vinh Tan Port instead of the sea. Vinh Tan Port was previously picked as a landfill for the waste mud dredged by the Vinh Tan 4 thermal power plant. The MoNRE’s original decision still had to await final approval of the Government. The ministry’s u-turn came following pressure from the public and the scientific community as the news broke in June. MoNRE’s Deputy Minister Nguyen Linh Ngoc on June 23 agreed to allow Vinh Tan 1 Electricity Company, which is in charge of the power plant of the same name, to dump 918,533 cubic metres of dredged mud and sand into the sea in Tuy Phong district. The sea area in question, however, was located adjacent to Hon Cau marine protected area in Tuy Phong. It is one of 16 marine protected areas in Vietnam. The proposal prompted public protests over fears the waste could threaten the coral ecosystem and sea life in the…... [read more]

The conference, which was jointly held by the Intergovernmental Oceanographic Commission under UNESCO, the French government, the Global Environment Fund, and the Global Forum on Oceans, focused on 3 topics including Ensuring Survival: Oceans, Climate and Security, Preserving Life: Marine Biodiversity and Networks of Marine Protected Areas, and Improving Governance: Achieving Integrated, Ecosystem-Based Ocean and Coastal Management. At a scientific and technical symposium, the participants discussed the relationship between science and policy formulation. Vietnam called for international assistance to vulnerable countries in the management of the seas and islands, in the context of climate change and rising sea levels. On the sidelines of the conference, Vietnam’s delegation, led by the Minister of Natural Resources and Environment Pham Khoi Nguyen had a series of bilateral meetings with international organisations such as the Global Environment Fund and the National Library of France.... [read more]

Local authorities turn “a deaf ear” to proposals on sea protection At a meeting with the press, Truong Kinh, Director of the Nha Trang Bay Marine Protected Area (MPA) said the MPA has almost no voice on issues relating to the economic development of the locality. “Our proposals on sea protection have been ignored when localities grant investment licenses to tourism projects,” Kinh said. “Especially, in the eyes of investors, we are like a big hindrance for their investment projects, while in the eyes of many local people, we are an obstacle for local economic development,” he added. Also according to Kinh, as for the tourism, resort and hotel projects on Hon Tre Island, located in the territory of the MPA, the MPA’s management board “cannot lay a hand on the projects.” It cannot carry out the management work within its own jurisdiction. The investors said “don’t poke your nose into others’ business,” arguing that they do not have to consult with the MPA, they just have to follow business law. The project on Nha Trang sea conservation, as Kinh pointed out, cannot meet the requirements for regional sea protection. “Our suggestions about policies to be applied to the MPA have always been put aside, because policy makers do not understand them, while leaders also do not understand,” Kinh complained. When the project on Nha Trang Bay preservation entered the second phase (2006-2011), the steering committee at the provincial level did not continue operation. As a result, the link between…... [read more]

The festival started with a parade from Ham Ninh Commune to Ham Ninh Harbor - a famous tourist spot on Phu Quoc Island and finished back at the Ham Ninh Commune. About 200 local students who are members of six WAR’s Marine Conservation Clubs throughout Phu Quoc Island took part in a serial of contests and other activities at Duong Beach. Students on Phu Quoc Island participating in dugong sand sculpture contest. Photo credit: WAR Students and tourists also got involved in a dugong (Dugong dugon) sand sculpture contest, a photo contest with photos featuring the beauty and threats to the island, and marine knowledge contest. “The Dugong Festival 2015 with many exciting and creative activities became an unforgettable memory for each participant, which encourages them to take part in protecting dugong and Phu Quoc,” said Do Thi Thanh Huyen – WAR’s wildlife education manager. “We expect that each people take at least one practical action to protect Phu Quoc marine resources and Vietnam’s marine resources in general so that our future generations could still benefit from the bountiful sea”. The festival is part of a project entitled “Conservation of Dugong and Biodiversity of Phu Quoc and Tho Chu island”, being implemented since 2013 by WAR and Phu Quoc Marine Protection Area.... [read more]

Green cards will be granted to territories which meet such criteria as efficient exploitation, social security, environmental protection and ecological safety. These cards will be granted for a temporary period only, and will be revoked for areas violating the prescribed criteria. The "Geographical area trademark" for Vietnam's sea will be registered with international organisations for recognition. The department proposed a list of 15 marine protected areas (MPA), four of which have been established namely Hon Mun in Khanh Hoa province, Cu Lao Cham islands in Quang Nam province, Phu Quoc islands in Kien Giang province and Con Co islands in Quang Tri province. The remaining 11 areas will be established between now and 2015, accounting for 0.24 percent of Vietnam's sea area. Currently, the department is co-coordinating with localities to complete documents recognising such islands as Ly Son, Co To, Cat Ba and Con Dao as MPAs.... [read more]

VietNamNet Bridge - 2016 has been a year full of burning environmental issues, with Vietnam saying that it would not welcome foreign investors who conduct transfer pricing or cause environmental problems. The discharge of untreated waste water polluted four provinces in the central region – Ha Tinh, Quang Binh, Quang Tri and Thua Thien – Hue, caused mass fish deaths and damaged local people’s livelihoods. PM Nguyen Xuan Phuc said at the online conference with local authorities on December 28 that the disaster caused the damage worth 0.3 percent of Vietnam’s GDP. Besides, it made many people become unemployed. By the third quarter of 2016, about 22,700 households and 65 communes in Ha Tinh province had been affected by the disaster. 24,500 people had lost their jobs or had not had stable jobs. 2016 has been a year full of burning environmental issues, with Vietnam saying that it would not welcome foreign investors who conduct transfer pricing or cause environmental problems. Lee & Man’s paper project in Hau Giang province, though it still has not been put into official operation, was feared to kill fish and aquatic creatures. The public was also stirred up by information that Binh Thuan provincial authorities considered clearing 1,000 hectares of the Hon Cau marine protected area to make room for the Vinh Tan thermal power center. A series of other investment projects involved a huge investment of billions of dollars and believed to cause environmental problems. These included the Hoa Sen Ca Na steel…... [read more]

Marine experts have been transplanting corals in swathes of sea surrounding southern Vietnam's Phu Quoc, in an attempt to revitalize the island's coral population. Marine experts have been transplanting corals in swathes of sea surrounding southern Vietnam's Phu Quoc, in an attempt to revitalize the island's coral population. On a warm December day near Mong Tay (Fingernail) Islet, a few hours by boat away from the port of An Thoi Town in Phu Quoc, a group of marine experts from Phu Quoc's Marine Protected Areas were putting on their diving gear to prepare for their daily visit to their coral garden, which spans 40 square meters of seabed at a depth of seven meters. Their task is to examine whether the corals, planted a few months prior, are adapting well to their new environment, and to replace any individuals that were no longer alive. Branches of healthy corals from natural reefs are cut and replanted in the garden, where they are attached to PVC frames fixed to the seabed. "Corals are animals by nature, and therefore are extremely sensitive to their surrounding environment," Ngoc, the group leader said. "A number of strict standards need to be met for corals to thrive, including unpolluted water, a substrate that is neither too deep nor too shallow, and a location away from human activities." At present, Phu Quoc Marine Protected Area only transplants staghorn corals, a stony coral with cylindrical branches, because of their ability to grow quickly and their importance in terms…... [read more]

Viet Nam News BÀ RỊA-VŨNG TÀU - The famous Côn Đảo Island's ecosystem and its biodiversity is seriously threatened by overexploitation and low environmental awareness of visitors and locals. Concerned officials as well as residents are calling for strong protective measures that can prevent the slide into irrecoverable loss. "The commercial hunting of marine resources and pollution of their natural habitat have resulted in a loss of natural regeneration of marine fauna," Trần Đình Huệ, deputy head of Côn Đảo National Park's Management Board, told the Lao Động (Labour) newspaper. "Out of ignorance, many people have been hunting for endangered species using different methods," said Nguyễn Văn Sơn, owner of a restaurant in Côn Đảo District. He said some visitors to the island still wanted to buy products from rare species like the eggs of vích (Cheloniidae), a kind of sea turtle. This demand would impact efforts to save and preserve the turtle, he said. While the depletion of natural resources is increasingly evident, inadequate penalties posed a challenge for forest rangers trying to prevent and discourage violations, Huệ said. A large number of fishing vessels can be seen in waters near the island every day. Instead of using traditional methods, fishermen can be seen using cyanide fishing - where the poisonous substance is sprayed to stun the fish, or using light to attract fish to specific areas to harvest them. Both methods are prohibited, Huệ said. In addition, fishermen are also illegally fishing in the wetlands of Côn Đảo…... [read more]

Viet Nam News BÌNH THUẬN - The Bình Thuận administration has sought to allay concerns over the proposed dumping of 1.5 cubic metres of "materials" into the ocean, saying these are "natural sea sediment", not industrial waste. However, officials have also acknowledged that the concerns are valid and the Ministry of Natural Resources and Environment (MoNRE) could re-assess the relevant project's environmental impacts. The sea sediment claim is contained in a report presented at a news conference by Nguyễn Ngọc Hai, Chairman of the Bình Thuận People's Committee. It says the 1.5 million cubic metres of materials that the Vĩnh Tân 1 Electric Power Co Ltd wants to dump into the ocean is natural sea sediment, not industrial waste. The press conference was held after many people expressed worries that the dumping could cause pollution in the sea area. The sediment will be dredged by a US$1.8 billion thermal power plant in the province's Vĩnh Tân Commune, Tuy Phong District. The project has been approved by the General Department of Energy under Ministry of Industry and Trade (MoIT). One component of the project is a specialised pier that can accommodate cargo ships of 30,000-50,000 DWT (deadweight tonnages). The seabed will have to be excavated for the water around the pier to have a depth of 12.7m. The environmental impact assessment of this project component - verified by MoNRE in 2014 - states that the initial amount of excavated sediment would be 1.5 million cubic metres, with another 269,000 cubic metres…... [read more]




Links Topics : http://news.c10mt.com/2017/08/ministry-backtracks-on-dumping-into-sea_10.html