No Australian anti-dumping duty temporarily on rod in coils

Duties of between 8.5 and 34.2 percent are likely to be imposed on Vietnamese aluminum extrusions. Australian authorities are likely to impose high anti-dumping duties on Vietnamese aluminum extrusions following an investigation. According to a notice issued this week by the Vietnam Competition Authority, duties of between 8.5 and 34.2 percent are expected to be added on Vietnam’s extrusions, which are products coming from aluminum alloys and used in a wide range of industries. The Australian Anti-Dumping Commission has recently wrapped up its anti-dumping and countervailing investigation on aluminum products imported from Vietnam and Malaysia. The official conclusions have not been announced and a final decision will be made by January 18. But preliminary findings are pointing towards high duties. The commission started its investigation in August, following a request from Capral Limited, an Australian aluminum extrusions manufacturer. Capral claimed that that Vietnamese aluminum extrusions producers have received subsidies from the government with preferential taxes and other favorable conditions. This allows them to sell their products at low prices and causes injury to the Australian aluminum industry, according to the company. The normal tariff rate for aluminum extrusions imported from Vietnam and Malaysia is 5 percent. Related news: > Turkey to impose anti-dumping duty on Vietnamese polyester yarn > Vietnamese steel faces anti-dumping lawsuits > US concludes anti-dumping investigation of Vietnamese steel firm... [read more]

Workers processing quicklime lumps in Vietnamese factory. Currently Viet Nam has been ruled as a non-dumping exporter of quicklime to the Australian market by the ADC — Photo limevietnam.com HA NOI (Biz Hub) — The Australian Anti Dumping Commission (ADC) recommended terminating an investigation into dumping of quicklime from Viet Nam, Malaysia and Thailand this month. In April this year, the ADC began investigating quicklime products imported from Viet Nam after Australian company Cockburn Cement Limited (Cockburn Cement) claimed that the Australian quicklime industry had been injured by the imports. However, the ADC found that while certain exports of quicklime from Malaysia, Thailand and Viet Nam were dumped, any injury to the Australian industry was negligible. The ADC also found that the average selling prices of imported quicklime from Thailand and Viet Nam were above the unsuppressed selling price proposed by Cockburn Cement, considering factors like reduction of market share, profits and profitability, employment, capacity utilisation and actual price suppression. During the investigation, the dumped imports from Malaysia, Thailand and Viet Nam represented less than 5 per cent of the Australian quicklime market; while Cockburn cement recorded a 28 per cent increase in sales volume from 2014 to 2015, with another rise expected for the first two quarters of 2016. Cockburn Cement is the only manufacturer of quicklime in the Western Australian market, while the dumped imports are imported within Western Australia only. The company claimed that its sales were impacted by imports from Malaysia, Thailand and Viet Nam. The…... [read more]

Viet Nam's aluminium extrusion is being investigated for dumping and countervailing duty by Australian Anti-dumping Commission. — Photo VNA HA NOI (Biz Hub) — The Anti-Dumping Commission under the Australian Department of Industry, Innovation and Science has initiated an investigation into dumping and countervailing duty on aluminium extrusions exported to Australia from Viet Nam and Malaysia. The investigation follows an application lodged by Capral Limited, a manufacturer of aluminium extrusions in Australia. The application alleges that the goods have been exported to Australia at prices less than their normal value and received countervailable subsidies from Viet Nam and Malaysia. It said the dumping and subsidisation had caused material injury to the Australian aluminium extrusions industry in the form of price suppression, loss of profits, reduced profitability, reduced capital expenditure, reduced return on investment and increased closing stocks. The investigation will examine exports in the period from July 1, 2015 to June 30, 2016 to determine whether dumping or subsidisation has occurred. Details of the Australian market from July 1, 2012 will be examined for injury analysis purposes. Capral estimated dumping margins of Vietnamese products at 10.19 per cent while the subsidy margin for exports was negligible. At present, the aluminium extrusions imported from Viet Nam and Malaysia were taxed a customs duty of 5 per cent. The Vietnam Competition Authority said this was the sixth lawsuit which included both anti-dumping and anti-countervailing for Vietnamese products exported to Australia since 2011. Previous products were PE bags, welded carbon-quality steel pipes, steel…... [read more]

The Australian Anti-Dumping Commission (ADC) has initiated an anti-dumping investigation on quicklime imported from Vietnam and two other countries, the Vietnam Competition Authority (VCA) announced on May 4. Vietnam shipped around 39,214 tons of quicklime to Australia in 2014 and 2015 The plaintiff - Cockburn Cement Limited – accused exporters of selling products at lower prices, causing significant damage to the Australian industry. According to the plaintiff, Vietnam shipped around 39,214 tons of quicklime to Australia in 2014 and 2015, accounting for 33.9% of market shares. The investigation period runs from January 1 to December 31, 2015, however, the ADC considered data on imports from January 1, 2012 to analyse the damage. The VCA said the plaintiff proposed dumping margins from 64.4% to 86.1% while the ADC just proposed 18%. This is the third time Vietnamese goods facing anti-dumping investigation in Australia, after transformer (2013) and zinc coated steel (2014). India on April 26 also released its report on its anti-dumping investigation into Plain Medium Density Fibreboard (MDF) imported from Vietnam and Indonesia. The Vietnam Competition Authority (VCA) under the Ministry of Industry and Trade said on April 28 the Indian Directorate General of Anti-Dumping and Allied Duties (DGAD) concluded that prices of MDF exported to India were lower than normal, causing significant damage to Indian industry. As the result, DGAD decided to impose dumping margins of 0-15% and damage margins of 10-40% on Vietnamese businesses that answered its questionnaires and dumping margins of 30-40% and damage margins of 35-45%…... [read more]

VietNamNet Bridge - The Malaysian Ministry of International Trade and Industry (MITI) has started an anti-dumping investigation on Vietnamese exports of alloy and non-alloy cold-rolled steel coils with the thickness of 0.2-2.6 mm and width of 700-1,300 mm. Analysts said that steel was one of several products that regularly face anti-dumping investigations conducted by importing countries. Deputy director of the Competition Administration Department (CAD) Nguyen Phuong Nam, confirming the news, said MITI would send questionnaires to Vietnamese steel manufacturers, while domestic manufacturers could ask MITI for questionnaires. According to the Ministry of Industry and Trade, Malaysia imported around 151,000 tons of steel worth $110 million from Vietnam in 2014. Prior to that, the Australian Anti-Dumping Commission (ADC) conducted an investigation over zinc-coated (galvanised) steel imported from Vietnam. The probe finished last month when ADC stated that Vietnamese galvanised steel shipped to Australia was not sold at dumping prices, therefore posing no threat to Australia’s domestic steel production. Professor Nguyen Thi Mo from the International Arbitration Center (IAC) noted that the majority of Vietnamese enterprises subject to the investigations did not have deep knowledge about the laws and the management mechanisms applied by the import countries. Mo also noted that in many cases, Vietnamese businesses could not anticipate risks and they signed contracts without legal instruments to protect their benefits. When negotiating with foreign partners, businesses only paid attention to some basic provisions on quantity, quality, prices and payment methods, while they ignored the provisions on fines and compensation for damages.…... [read more]

HA NOI (VNS) — The Australian Anti-Dumping Commission (ADC) has announced the conclusion of its investigation into dumping allegations over zinc-coated (galvanised) steel imported from Viet Nam. The Vietnamese trade mission in Australia said the ADC had concluded that Vietnamese galvanised steel shipped to Australia was of unremarkable quantity and was not sold at dumping prices, thereby posing no threat to Australia's domestic steel production. Previously, in 2013, BlueScope Steel filed a complaint accusing exporters of dumping Vietnamese zinc-coated steel in Australia, with a dumping margin of 16.26 per cent. Although Viet Nam's steel, at around 12,524 tonnes, accounted for just 6.9 per cent of Australia's total zinc-coated steel imports, BlueScope Steel said Vietnamese steel had caused significant damage to the domestic industry. As more lawsuits related to trade defence are expected to arise when Viet Nam further integrates into the world economy, Vietnamese businesses are advised to have plausible evidence and strong arguments to prove and protect their legitimate interests. — VNS... [read more]

The Australian Anti-Dumping Commission (ADC) has announced its decision to conclude its dumping investigation into zinc-coated (galvanised) steel imported from Vietnam. The Vietnamese trade mission in Australia said the ADC concluded that Vietnamese galvanised steel shipped to Australia was of unremarkable quantity and not sold at dumping prices, therefore posing no threat to Australia’s domestic steel production. Previously, in July last year, BlueScope Steel filed a complaint accusing Vietnamese zinc-coated steel of being dumped in Australia with a dumping margin of 16.26 percent. Although Vietnam’s steel, at around 12,524 tonnes, accounted for just 6.9 percent of total Australia’s zinc-coated steel imports, BlueScope Steel said Vietnamese steel caused significant damages to the domestic industry. As more and more lawsuits related to trade defence are expected when Vietnam further integrates into the world economic economy, Vietnamese businesses are advised to have plausible evidence and strong argument to prove and protect their legitimate interests. VNA... [read more]

(VOV) - The Australian Anti-Dumping Commission (ADC) has announced to conclude its investigation into of zinc-coated (galvanised) steel imported from Vietnam The ADC said after more than one year conducting investigations, it found that the volume of Vietnamese galvanised steel imported into Australia was not worth considering and not sold at dumping prices as BlueScope Steel – the plaintiff – accused. Earlier in late July last year, the plaintiff blamed that Vietnamese zinc-coated steel dumped prices in Australia with range of prices to 16.26%. Although Vietnam just shipped around 12,524 tonnes of steel to Australia, equal to 6.9% of total Australia’s steel imports, the plaintiff said Vietnamese steel caused significant damages to the Australian industry. In late July this year, the ADC announced its ending investigations into -coated (galvanised) steel imported from India and Vietnam. Vietnam shipped around 23,253 tonnes of steel worth US$18.1 million to Australia during the investigated period. Accordingly, ADC accepted the results of Australian investigation agency that galvanised steel imported from India and Vietnam was not sold at dumping prices.... [read more]

HA NOI (VNS) — The Australian Anti-Dumping Commission (ADC) announced last week that the anti-dumping investigation into zinc coated (galvanised) steel imported from Viet Nam and India was terminated. The ADC launched an investigation into alleged dumping of galvanised steel exports to Australia in July of 2014, following an application lodged by BlueScope Steel Limited. The commission said the galvanised steel exported to Australia during the investigation period (July 1, 2013 to June 30, 2014) by Vietnamese Hoa Sen Group only showed negligible amounts of dumped steel with negligible harm to Australia's industry. Thus, it decided to terminate the investigation. The volume of Vietnamese steel exported to Australia during the investigation period was more than 23,250 tonnes, with a net value of US$18.1 million, according to the Ministry of Industry and Trade's Viet Nam Competition Authority (VAC). According to VCA, BlueScope Steel Limited previously filed a dumping margin of 16.26 per cent against galvanised steel products imported from Viet Nam. The company claimed Vietnamese products were sold at below fair market value, causing significant damage to Australia's steel industry. — VNS... [read more]

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