Vietnamese shrimp exporters struggle to compete in US

Vladimir Putin said the United States would have to cut its diplomatic staff in Russia by 755 people and that Moscow could consider additional measures against Washington as a response to new U.S. sanctions approved by Congress. Moscow ordered the United States on Friday to cut hundreds of diplomatic staff and said it would seize two U.S. diplomatic properties after the U.S. House of Representatives and the Senate overwhelmingly approved new sanctions on Russia. The White House said on Friday that U.S. President Donald Trump would sign the sanctions bill. Putin said in an interview with Vesti TV released on Sunday that the United States would have to cut its diplomatic and technical staff by 755 people by Sept. 1. "Because more than 1,000 workers - diplomats and support staff - were working and are still working in Russia, 755 must stop their activity in the Russian Federation," he said. The new U.S. sanctions were partly a response to conclusions by U.S. intelligence agencies that Russia meddled in the 2016 U.S. presidential election, and to punish Russia further for its annexation of Crimea from Ukraine in 2014. Russia's response suggested it had set aside initial hopes of better ties with Washington under Trump, something the Republican president, before he was elected, had said he wanted to achieve. A federal law enforcement investigation and multiple U.S. congressional probes looking into the possibility that Trump's campaign colluded with Russia have made it harder for Trump to open a new chapter with…... [read more]

MOSCOW: President Vladimir Putin on Sunday (Jul 30) said the United States would have to cut 755 diplomatic staff in Russia and warned of a prolonged gridlock in its ties after the US Congress backed new sanctions against the Kremlin. This photo taken on May 7, 2013 shows Russian and the US flags running up as the US Secretary of State arrives at Moscow Vnukovo Airport. (Photo: AFP/Mladen Antonov) Putin added bluntly that Russia was able to raise the stakes with America even further, although he hoped this would be unnecessary. On Friday, the Russian foreign ministry demanded Washington cut its diplomatic presence in Russia by Sep 1 to 455 people - the same number Moscow has in the US. "More than a thousand people - diplomats and technical personnel - were working and are still working" at the US embassy and consulates, Putin said in an interview with Rossia-24 television. "755 people must stop their activities in Russia." The US State Department, solicited for a response by AFP, said it did not comment on "the number" of US officials serving abroad. Putin added that an upturn in Russia's relations with Washington could not be expected "any time soon". "We have waited long enough, hoping that the situation would perhaps change for the better," he said. "But it seems that even if the situation is changing, it's not for any…... [read more]

China said Monday the U.S. should not link trade to discussions about North Korea's nuclear program, after President Donald Trump accused Beijing of taking no action on Pyongyang despite profiting from business with America. "We believe that the North Korea nuclear issue and China-U.S. trade are two issues that are in two completely different domains," Chinese Vice Minister of Commerce Qian Keming told a press briefing, adding the issues "are not related, and should not be discussed together". "In general, China-U.S. trade, including mutual investment, is mutually beneficial, and both China and the United States have gained great profits from bilateral trade and investment cooperations," he said. The comments came in response to a question about tweets from Trump Saturday warning that he would no longer allow China to "do nothing" on North Korea, after the hermit state launched its second intercontinental ballistic missile test. Trump, who is at loggerheads with Beijing over how to handle Kim's regime, has repeatedly urged China to rein in its recalcitrant neighbor, but Beijing insists dialogue is the only practical way forward. In his critique, Trump linked trade woes with the Asian giant to policy on North Korea, after South Korea indicated it was speeding up the deployment of a U.S. missile defence system (THAAD) that has infuriated China. "I am very disappointed in China. Our foolish past leaders have allowed them to make hundreds of billions of dollars a year in trade, yet they do NOTHING for us with North Korea, just…... [read more]

U.S. President Donald Trump threatened on Saturday to end government payments to health insurers if Congress does not pass a new healthcare bill and goaded them to not abandon their seven-year quest to replace the Obamacare law. The tweet came a day after Senate Republicans failed to muster enough votes to repeal parts of the Affordable Care Act, President Barack Obama's signature healthcare bill commonly known as Obamacare. The first part of Trump's tweet appeared to be referring to the approximately $8 billion in cost-sharing reduction subsidies the federal government pays to insurers to lower the price of health coverage for low-income Americans. The second part appeared to be a threat to end the employer contribution for Congress members and their staffs, who were moved from the normal federal employee healthcare benefits program onto the Obamacare insurance exchanges as part of the 2010 healthcare law. Trump has previously threatened to suspend the payments to insurers, which are determined by the Department of Health and Human Services. In April, he threatened to end the payments if Democrats refused to negotiate over the healthcare bill. Responding to Saturday's tweet, Senate Democratic leader Chuck Schumer said that if the president carried out that threat, "every expert agrees that (insurance) premiums will go up and health care will be more expensive for millions of Americans." "The president ought to stop playing politics with people's lives and health care, start leading and finally begin acting presidential,” Schumer said in a statement. Trump later urged…... [read more]

People watch as coverage of an ICBM missile test is displayed on a screen in a public square in Pyongyang on July 29, 2017. Photo by AFP/Kim Won-Jin. US President Donald Trump warned Saturday that he would not allow China to "do nothing" on North Korea, after the hermit state launched an intercontinental ballistic missile test it boasted could reach the United States. North Korean leader Kim Jong-Un boasted of his country's ability to strike any target in the US after the ICBM test that weapons experts said could even bring New York into range -- in a major challenge to Trump. Under Kim's leadership, North Korea has accelerated its drive towards a credible nuclear strike capability, in defiance of international condemnation and multiple sets of UN sanctions. In his critique of Beijing, which came in two tweets, Trump linked trade strains with the Asian giant -- marked by a trade deficit of $309 billion last year -- to policy on North Korea, after South Korea indicated it was speeding the deployment of a US missile defense system that has infuriated China. "I am very disappointed in China. Our foolish past leaders have allowed them to make hundreds of billions of dollars a year in trade, yet they do NOTHING for us with North Korea, just talk," Trump wrote. US 'within striking range'  Kim said the test "is meant to send a grave warning to the US" and demonstrated the North's ability to launch "at any place and time," the…... [read more]

North Korea said on Saturday it had conducted another successful test of an intercontinental ballistic missile (ICBM) that proved its ability to strike America's mainland, drawing a sharp warning from U.S. President Donald Trump and a rebuke from China. However, later on Saturday Trump wrote on Twitter that he was "very disappointed" in China and that Beijing had done "nothing" for the United States in regards to North Korea, something he would not allow to continue. North Korean leader Kim Jong Un personally supervised the midnight launch of the missile on Friday night and said it was a "stern warning" for the United States that it would not be safe from destruction if it tries to attack, the North's official KCNA news agency said. North Korea's state television broadcast pictures of the launch, showing the missile lifting off in a fiery blast in darkness and Kim cheering with military aides. "The test-fire reconfirmed the reliability of the ICBM system, demonstrated the capability of making a surprise launch of the ICBM in any region and place any time, and clearly proved that the whole U.S. mainland is in the firing range of the DPRK missiles, (Kim) said with pride," KCNA said. Intercontinental ballistic missile (ICBM) Hwasong-14 is pictured during its second test-fire in this undated picture provided by KCNA in Pyongyang on July 29, 2017. KCNA via Reuters. DPRK is short for the North's official name, the Democratic People's Republic of Korea. China, the North's main ally, said it opposed…... [read more]

North Korea fired a missile on Friday that experts said was capable of hitting Los Angeles and other U.S. cities and the United States and South Korea responded by staging a joint missile exercise. North Korea confirmed the launch on Saturday, with its official news agency saying it was a "stern warning" for the United States. President Kim Jong Un said the missile showed that all of the United States was within striking distance but U.S. authorities characterized that as an exaggeration. The administration of U.S. President Donald Trump, which has branded North Korea the "most urgent and dangerous threat to peace," condemned the launch as reckless. "By threatening the world, these weapons and tests further isolate North Korea, weaken its economy, and deprive its people," President Donald Trump said in a statement. "The United States will take all necessary steps to ensure the security of the American homeland and protect our allies in the region." South Korean Defense Minister Song Young-moo said at a news conference on Saturday Seoul would prepare independent measures to curb the nuclear threat from the North. "This ballistic missile launch by North Korea is a serious provocation that not only clearly violates the U.N. Security Council’s numerous resolutions but also threatens the safety of the Korean peninsula and world peace," Song said. "The joint governments of South Korea and the United States will firmly punish North Korea for its missile provocation." He said steps would be taken to hasten the temporary deployment of…... [read more]

WASHINGTON: The International Monetary Fund on Friday said that the US dollar was overvalued by 10 per cent to 20 per cent, based on US near-term economic fundamentals, while it viewed valuations of the euro, Japan's yen, and China's yuan as broadly in line with fundamentals. A logo is seen outside the headquarters of the International Monetary Fund Jun 30, 2015 in Washington, DC. (Photo: AFP/Brendan Smialowski) The IMF's External Sector Report - an annual assessment of currencies and external surpluses and deficits of major economies - showed that external current account deficits were becoming more concentrated in certain advanced economies such as the United States and Britain, while surpluses remained persistent in China and Germany. While the report assessed the euro's valuation as appropriate for the eurozone as a whole, it said the euro's real effective exchange rate was 10-20 per cent too low for Germany's fundamentals, given its high current account surplus. Britain's pound, meanwhile, was assessed as up to 15 per cent overvalued compared to fundamentals, which include a high level of uncertainty over Britain's post-Brexit trading relationship with the European Union. The Fund said the dollar's appreciation in recent years was based on its relatively stronger growth outlook, interest rate hikes versus looser monetary policy in the eurozone and Japan, as well as expectations for fiscal stimulus from President Donald Trump's administration. But so far this year, the dollar…... [read more]

LONDON: Charlie Gard, the terminally-ill British baby whose plight drew sympathy from Pope Francis and US President Donald Trump and sparked a debate about medical ethics, died on Friday (Jul 28), his mother said. British baby Charlie Gard suffered from a rare genetic disorder. (Photo: AFP/Chris J Ratcliffe) His parents, Connie Yates and Chris Gard, had fought a lengthy legal battle to allow him to be taken to the United States for treatment for a rare genetic condition. But despite the international attention brought by his case, he died exactly one week short of his first birthday. "Our beautiful little boy has gone. We are so proud of you, Charlie," his mother Yates said in a statement. A court had ordered that the 11-month-old should be moved from hospital to a hospice, where his life support was withdrawn. Supporters around the world donated £1.35 million (US$1.75 million, €1.5 million) via an online fundraising site to support his parents and their efforts to keep their son alive, while 350,000 signed a petition demanding that he be allowed to receive experimental treatment in the US. Following news of the boy's death, Pope Francis, who supported the campaign, tweeted: "I entrust little Charlie to the Father and pray for his parents and all those who loved him." British Prime Minister Theresa May said she was "deeply saddened" by the death while US Vice President Mike…... [read more]

Clashes between Venezuelan security forces and demonstrators have killed five people during the latest opposition-led strike to protest an election on Sunday that critics contend will mark the end of democracy in the oil-rich country. As Venezuela's crisis deepened, Colombian airline Avianca on Thursday canceled its operations in the country and the U.S. State Department said it was ordering family members of U.S. employees at its embassy in Caracas to leave ahead of the vote. Critics of President Nicolas Maduro were planning to pile more pressure on the unpopular leftist leader by holding a major protest dubbed 'The takeover of Venezuela' on Friday. "If yesterday and today the streets were empty, tomorrow we must take over all of Venezuela," said opposition lawmaker Freddy Guevara, referring to a two-day anti-government strike that started on Wednesday. Interior Minister Nestor Reverol warned that protests were banned from Friday to Tuesday, leaving open the likelihood of more violence in volatile Venezuela. Many Venezuelans are nervous and have been stocking up on food and staying home. On Thursday, the U.S. State Department also authorized the voluntary departure of U.S. government employees at its embassy in Caracas. President Donald Trump has warned that his administration could impose economic sanctions on Venezuela if Maduro goes ahead with the vote to create a legislative superbody known as the Constituent Assembly. The Constituent Assembly would have power to rewrite the constitution and shut down the existing opposition-led legislature, which the opposition maintains would cement dictatorship in Venezuela. At…... [read more]




Links Topics : http://news.c10mt.com/2017/08/vietnamese-shrimp-exporters-struggle-to.html