Efforts made to control disease safety in shrimp exported to Australia

NDO – Information from the Vietnam Competition Authority, under the Ministry of Industry and Trade, revealed that the US Department of Commerce (DOC) has announced its decision to adjust the antidumping duty on Vietnamese shrimp exported to the country, between February 1, 2013 and January 31, 2014, from 1.16% to 1.42%. The decision was made following changes in dumping calculations, although on September 7, 2015, the DOC publicised the results of its ninth administrative review (POR9) on frozen shrimp imported from Vietnam. The DOC has used a country with a similarly sized economy in order to set the level of anti-dumping duty on Vietnamese shrimp. In previous years, the department had used rates from Bangladesh to determine the duty. However, this year a group of US vessel owners and processors complained, prompting the department to replace Bangladesh with India. This decision means that the selected importers are subjected to a higher anti-dumping duty on imported shrimp during the 12-month period beginning in February 2013. Companies that import products from Vietnam into the US have to pay cash deposits and the dumping margins will then be taken from these deposits. According to Truong Dinh Hoe, General Secretary of the Vietnam Association of Seafood Exporters and Producers (VASEP), the imposition of higher anti-dumping tax rate on Vietnamese shrimp, to protect domestic American fisheries, by the DOC is unreasonable and unfair and the VESEP continues to oppose the decision. The higher anti-dumping duty will increase the price…... [read more]

Workers process shrimps for export (Source: VNA) Hanoi (VNA) –The US Department of Commerce (DOC) has announced its decision to adjust antidumping duty on Vietnamese shrimp exported to the US between February 1, 2013 and January 31, 2014 from 1.16 percent to 1.42 percent. The decision was made following changes in dumping calculations, although on September 7, 2015, the DOC publicised results of its ninth administrative review (POR9) on frozen shrimp imported from Vietnam. The DOC has used a country with a similarly sized economy to set the level of anti-dumping duty on Vietnamese shrimp. In previous years, the department used rates from Bangladesh. However, this year, a group of US vessel owners and processors complained, prompting the department to replace Bangladesh with India. Companies that import products from Vietnam into the US have to pay cash deposits and the dumping margins will be taken from these deposits. The higher anti-dumping duty will increase the price of Vietnamese shrimp in the US, hurting the product’s competitiveness. Tran Van Linh, General Director of Thuan Phuoc Seafood and Trading Corporation, said Thuan Phuoc was one of three companies facing high anti-dumping tax rate during the POR9. With the re-evaluation, the duty imposed on concerned units may increase and differ, he added, explaining that export countries set anti-dumping tax aiming to protect domestic production. Linh noted that it is even harder for foreign seafood to…... [read more]

In 2010, the export turnover of Vietnamese agricultural, forestry, and aquatic products hit a record high of US$19.5 billion. The export value of these products to Japan alone reached US$1.5 billion, up 18 percent. Taking advantage of the VJEPA Vo Thanh Ha from the Asia-Pacific Market Management under the Ministry of Industry and Trade (MoIT) said that Vietnamese farm produce will benefit the most from the VJEPA under which Japan commits to cut tariffs on products which make up nearly 84 percent of the total value of Vietnamese farm produce exports. As soon as the VJEPA took effect on October 1, 2009, Japan cut tariffs on 784 out of 2,020 tax lines on farm produce, or 36 percent of the total tax lines on farm produce, and 67.6 percent of Vietnam’s total export value to Japan. Fourteen products including seasoning, soybeans, ginger, bananas, durian, and rambutans, which account for 14 percent of Vietnamese farm produce exported to Japan, will see the tariff cuts over a period of 3-5 years. 72 other agricultural products will enjoy the tariff cuts within 7 years, and 214 products within 10 years. 64 out of 330 products, or 71 percent of seafood exports value to Japan, enjoyed tax cuts immediately after the agreement came into effect. Vietnamese shrimp exported to Japan now enjoy zero percent import tax. In 2010, shrimp exports saw the most significant increase with export turnover of US$581 million (up 27.6 percent against 2009), followed by cuttlefish with $114 million (up 23.3…... [read more]

Vietnamese shrimp companies will have to pay the highest tariffs ever for exporting shrimp to the US market. The imposition of tariffs on Vietnamese shrimp is unfair and runs counter to the Vietnam-US comprehensive partnership. According to the US Department of Commerce (DOC)’s final decision on the anti-dumping duties on Vietnamese shrimp for the 8th period of review from February 1, 2012, to January 31, 2013, 32 Vietnamese shrimp exporters will be subject to the highest level of tariffs. The duties will be 4.98% for Minh Phu Seafood Corporation, 9.75% for Soc Trang Seafood Joint Stock Company STAPIMEX and 6.37% for 30 other companies. The general duties for Vietnamese companies will be 25.76%. According to regulations, Vietnamese enterprises have 30 days to file a petition against the DOC’s decision at the US Court of International Trade. Unfair, groundless decision In March, 2014, when the preliminary outcome of the 8th period of review on anti-dumping duties on shrimp imports to the US market was announced, Vietnamese enterprises opposed the US Department of Commerce’s decision. In fact, Vietnamese enterprises don’t receive any subsidy from the government for the production of exported shrimp. Vietnamese shrimp are cheaper than American shrimp because Vietnamese enterprises enjoy more favourable natural conditions, so their production costs are lower. Nguyen Huu Dung is Vice President of the Vietnam Association of Seafood Exporters and Producers: “Vietnam and the US have different technologies for shrimp production. American shrimp are caught at sea while Vietnamese shrimp are raised in fresh water.…... [read more]

The US Department of Commerce (DOC) on August 13 decided to levy anti-subsidy duties on frozen shrimp imported from Vietnam. Under the Department’s latest decision, the two compulsory defendants - Minh Qui Seafood Co Ltd and Nha Trang Seafood JSC - will face anti-subsidy duties of 7.88% and 1.15%, respectively. Other Vietnamese businesses that export frozen shrimp to the US will be imposed a rate of 4.52%. The DOC asked the US Customs and Border Protection (CBP) to collect cash deposits sent by Vietnamese shrimp exporters to the US as of June 4, 2013. The DOC’s final decision will be submitted to the International Trade Commission (ITC) for approval before being announced on September 26. If the ITC certifies that US businesses suffer property losses due to the Vietnamese government’s subsidy, the DOC will officially levy anti-subsidy duties on October 3, 2013. Otherwise, the DOC’s lawsuit against imported shrimp from Vietnam will come to an end when the ITC finds no property losses in US businesses. The DOC conducted an anti-subsidy investigation after the Coalition of Gulf Shrimp Industries (COGSI) petitioned against subsidy policies of several countries, including Vietnam. The lawsuit is unreasonable and likely to create double taxation that will heavily affect more than 600,000 aquacultural farmers as well as seafood producers and exporters in Vietnam.... [read more]

For the first quarter of the year, Vietnam shrimp exports plummeted 28.1% on year to US$798 million with exports to major markets such as the US and Japan falling off by 55.8% and 27.6% respectively. Shrimp prices in the US market went into a serious free fall, particularly the prices for white-leg shrimp fuelled by an appreciation of the US dollar against the Vietnamese dong making imports less expensive. Official statistics show that though total worldwide US shrimp imports in January and February jumped 5% in volume they dipped a hefty 11% in value. From an average price of US$12 kg in the last quarter of 2014, they fell to US$11 kg in January 2015 and dropped further to US$10 kg in February. Supplies simply far outpaced demand, while imports in 2014 were historically high resulting in a glut of shrimp in the US domestic distribution chain that was already holding large inventories of frozen shrimp. As of the end of March, Vietnamese shrimp exports to the US declined to US$116.3 million, compared to US$263.3 million for the corresponding period a year earlier. Peeled frozen shrimp has traditionally accounted for over 50% of the US import market. Vietnam is now the 3rd largest supplier, after Indonesia and India. Leading market analysts think prices have bottomed out in the market given that US shrimp distributors have worked their way through excess holiday inventories and now predict the US market to rebound and return to normal buying patterns through the remainder of…... [read more]

According to a decision announced by the US Department of Commerce (DOC) on September 9, the businesses include Minh Phat Seafood Co. Ltd., Ca Mau Frozen Seafood Processing Import-Export Corp, Grobest&I-mei Industry Vietnam and Viet Hai Seafood Co. Ltd. This was the result of the DOC’s second administrative review of anti-dumping taxes on Vietnam’s frozen warm-water shrimp during the period between February 1, 2006 and January 31, 2007. Under the decision, 23 Vietnamese shrimp exporters are subject to a 4.57 percent tax rate and one business enjoys the rate of 4.3 percent, while all the rest have to pay a 25.76 percent tax. The fisheries industry sets a target of earning US$850 million from exports of aquatic products to the US this year. Last year Vietnam’s products made up 6.2 percent of the US’s total seafood imports, worth US$12 billion.... [read more]

According to the Vietnam Association of Seafood Exporters and Processors (VASEP), the bond, worth approximately US$4.2 million, was paid by the Mseafood Corporation, in which MPC holds a 90 percent stake, upon gaining entry into the US market. Following the US Customs Service’s verdict, MPC will benefit from an anti-dumping tax rate of 0 percent being levied on its products. Most Vietnamese shrimp exporters are currently subject to a tax rate of 25.76 percent, while a number of firms bear a rate of 4-5 percent and some others enjoy a zero-rate tax. The price of domestic shrimp is currently around 30 percent higher than in late 2008, when it hit a ten-year record low. The increase has given encouragement to Vietnamese shrimp exporters despite facing a shortage of capital and a rise in production costs. Vietnam earned more than US$1.6 billion from shrimp exports last year.... [read more]

Under the agreement, Japan pledges to liberalize 94.53 percent of trade revenues within 10 years and to impose tax rates on industrial commodities at 0-5 percent, said Le Trieu Dung, an official from the Ministry of Industry and Trade. Japan will also cut tariffs on agricultural, forestry and aquatic products, he said. The country will gradually remove all taxes on pepper and maze in the next five to seven years. Vietnamese shrimps exported to Japan will also enjoy no taxes, Mr Dung added, as well as Vietnamese cuttlefish and octopuses in the next five years. Addressing the seminar, Ken Arakawa, a senior advisor at the Japan External Trade Organization, stressed that the Japanese Government has always highly valued the Vietnamese market and considers Vietnam a very reliable partner. Mr Arakawa maintained that the Japanese Government has tried to create the best possible conditions for Japanese investors to do business in Vietnam, especially in training human resources and upgrading the economic infrastructure. Japan is so far one of the first and largest investors in Vietnam, he said. However, Vietnamese goods have not been successful in penetrating the Japanese market, said Tran Ba Cuong from the Export-Import Department under the Ministry of Industry and Trade. He said that the ministry recommends businesses hammer out long-term strategies to invest in production and boost trade promotions as well as improving the designs of goods for export.... [read more]

The General Department of Customs reported that Vietnam exported about 190,000 tonnes of shrimp and earned over US$1.5 billion, up 7.4 percent in volume and 0.73 percent in value compared to 2008. 2009 was a tough year for the aquaculture sector due to epidemic diseases, adverse weather and production difficulties. Especially, sugpo prawn prices hit a 10-year record low in the first six months because of the economic slump. For this reason, many farmers stopped raising shrimp. Altogether, leading to a sharp decline in production. Now that world demand is increasing, Vietnam’s shortfall of stock for export has driven sugpo prawn prices up by VND30,000 to VND120,000-150,000 per kilo. 2009 was a banner year for shrimp with 80 percent of farming households earning an average profit of VND50-60 million, even up to hundreds of millions of VND. In 2009, Vietnamese shrimp were exported to 82 markets, the biggest of which were Japan, the US, the Republic of Korea (RoK), Taiwan, Germany, China, Australia, Canada, Britain and Belgium. Sugpo prawns, which contribute 75 percent of the total value, were a key product. RoK, China and Australia are potential markets for the expansion of Vietnamese shrimp, together buying about 20 percent of the exported products. Also, notably, Germany’s shrimp imports make up 30 percent of all European countries imports put together. This year, according to Truong Dinh Hoe, General Secretary of the Vietnam Association of Seafood Exporters and Producers, sugpo prawn will still be the key export product and the export value…... [read more]




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